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What can I plant in January?

What can I plant in January?  What flowers can I plant in January?  What can I plant in winter?  What vegetables can I plant in January?  What can I plant in January ready for Spring?  How can I protect my plants in winter?

Enjoy your garden all year round with our monthly suggestions of what to plant, how to plant and how to maintain your garden depending on the time of year.  

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Geraniums

Geraniums are a beautiful bushy plants which come in a variety of colours.  They are pretty, hardy plants and a cheap way to fill borders. 

 

Sow seeds from mid January to mid March in pots or trays, then cover with a thin layer of compost.  Place in a propagator or sealed container in a polythene bag and put in a warm place, temperatures should be kept between 20-25C.  Make sure they are kept in a light area as this will help them germinate, germination usually takes 3-21 days.  Keep the soil moist but be sure not to over water, the soil should not become water logged.  

 

Once seedlings are large enough to handle, move them into 7.5cm trays or pots.   Gently acclimatise your plants to the cold weather over the space of a few weeks before planting them outside.  You certainly want to wait until the risk of frost has passed.  Plant 30cm apart in borders or in containers spaced 15cm apart.  

Flowers June to October/November.

Sweet Peas

Sweet Peas are both attractive to the eye and sweet smelling to the nose.  They are easy to grow, can be trained to climb a trellis and will fill a room with a wonderful fragrance if picked and placed in a vase.  

You should sow seeds from mid January - Mid March in trays or pots filled with a good seeping compost.  Sow seeds approximately 6mm deep, 3 seeds per 7.5cm pot.  Place in a propagator or sealed container in a polythene bag and put in a warm place. temperatures should be kept between 18-20C.  Germination usually takes 7-21 days.

When all risk of frost has gone and the seeds are large enough to handle, you can plant in larger pots or plants outside roughly 30cm apart.

Flowers May/June to August.

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Dahlias

Dahlias are not only large and vibrant flowers but they are edible too!  The flavour can vary depending on the condition of the soil they are grown in so make sure you invest in some quality soil (multipurpose topsoil) or compost.  Flavours range from water chestnut through to a spicy apple or even carrot.  These flowers create a dome shaped bush and are the perfect addition to any bedding display.

Dahlias need to be sown around 6mm deep and kept in temperatures of 21-24C.  Use a good seeding compost in your pots or trays then place them in a propagator or sealed container in a polythene bag and put in a warm place.  Germination usually takes 7-10 days.

Once the weather has warmed up and risk of frost has past you can begin to move the seeds to cooler areas for 10-15 days prior to moving them outside.  Plant 30cm apart in a sunny spot with moisture retentive soil.

Flowers July to October/November.

Delphinium

These impressive flowers are hard to miss due to the fact that they can grow to over 2 metres tall.  Part of the buttercup family, they have been grown in the UK for centuries and are a staple part of cottage gardens and borders.

Sow in January, 3mm deep in 8cm pots or trays filled with seeding compost.  The compost should be moist but not wet, be careful not to over water.  Seal in a polythene bag until after germination which takes around 1-3 months.  Temperatures should be kept at 10-13C.  When seedlings are large enough to handle, transfer into 8cm pots or trays.  Plants can be moved outside once the chance of frost has passed.  Plant at 60cm apart in a sunny spot with some shade.  For best results use rich soil such as our multipurpose topsoil with added soil improver.

Flowers June and July.

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Begonias, tubular and bedding 

There are over 2002 species of Begonia, making them one of the largest genre of flowering plants.  These bushy type plants comes in a variety of pastel colours.  Some of the petals are edible and will add a lemony taste to your salads.  Make sure to read the packets before eating to see if your begonia is an edible strain.  Either way, this fragrant flower will certainly add some colour to your garden display.

To seed - fill a tray with a good, damp, free draining,  seeding compost.  Sprinkle the seeds evenly on top of the compost, no need to cover the seeds.   Place in a propagator or sealed container inside a polythene bag at a temperature of 25C.  Germination usually takes 14-28 days.   

When seedlings are large enough to handle, replant them into 7.5cm pots and move them to a cooler area for a few weeks before moving them outside.  They can go outside once the chance of frost has ended.  They can be planted 20-30 cm apart outside in a sunny spot with some shade.

Flowers July - October/November.

Petunias

Petunias are widely popular in gardens due to their exceptional blooms and lengthy flowering period.  They are great for both ground cover and trailing in hanging baskets.

Sow Petunia seeds in a tray of seed compost.  Press the pellets gently into the soil, sealing in a polythene bag after sowing is helpful.  Leave them in an area with plenty of light and a temperature of 21-27C to germinate, which should take about 10-15 days.  Once seedlings are large enough to handle move them into boxes or 7.5cm pots.  Gradually move into cooler climates over a 2 week period, ready for transporting outside.  Allow them to become well established before moving outside.

 

Plant outside in late May-June, when all risk of frost has passed, 45-60cm apart in full sun and well drained soil. Plant 15-23cm  apart in window boxes, baskets and containers in May.

Flowers late June to September.

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Icelandic Poppies

This sunny flower is the Papaver nudicaule, otherwise known as the Icelandic Poppy.  The bowl-shaped flowers last for weeks on end, in a range of shades including cream, yellow, salmon, orange, pink and red.  If you enjoy inviting wildlife into your garden, these flowers are going to attract bees and butterfly's with their fright colours and fragrant aroma.  

Sow poppy seed on the surface of a free draining, damp seed compost  Place in a propagator or sealed container inside a polythene bag at a temperature of around 18-20C.  Germination usually takes 14-30 days, ensure they get plenty of light during this time. 

 

Once seedlings are large enough to handle move them into boxes or 7.5cm pots filled with fertile, well drained soil.  Gradually move into cooler climates over a 2 week period, ready for transporting outside.  Allow them to become well established before moving outside.  

Poppies can be planted outside once the temperature is above 14C.  Space them 30cm apart.  They prefer a sandy, loamy soil that is not too damp.

Flowers June to October.